Alcohol & Breast Cancer - Oncology Nutrition DPG - breast cancer and alcoholism

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breast cancer and alcoholism - Alcohol | Susan G. Komen®


Alcohol can increase levels of estrogen and other hormones associated with hormone-receptor-positive breast cancer. Alcohol also may increase breast cancer risk by damaging DNA in cells. Compared to women who don't drink at all, women who have three alcoholic drinks per week have a 15% higher risk of breast cancer. Breast cancer: Epidemiologic studies have consistently found an increased risk of breast cancer with increasing alcohol intake. Pooled data from 118 individual studies indicates that light drinkers have a slightly increased (1.04-fold higher) risk of breast cancer, compared with nondrinkers.

This is probably more important for other cancer types linked to alcohol rather than breast cancer. Physical activity. The evidence on the link between breast cancer risk and both weight and physical activity is a bit more complicated. This is because there is evidence that the causes of breast cancer that occur in women before the menopause. Oct 16, 2012 · A significant problem with alcohol and breast cancer studies, he says, has been that people tend to report less alcohol than they actually consume. As a result, such studies can overestimate the effect of a given amount of alcohol on breast cancer risk. Another limitation of these studies is the lack of information about drinking patterns.

May 23, 2017 · It notes that the relationship between alcohol and breast cancer could occur “in part because the dietary patterns of consumers of alcohol may differ from those of people who do not consume alcohol. Alcohol & Breast Cancer Question: I have a history of breast cancer. I've heard it's OK to drink up to one glass of wine per day. Recently, I read that women concerned about breast cancer should have no more than two drinks per week.

Alcohol, estrogen and breast cancer risk. Alcohol can change the way a woman's body metabolizes estrogen (how estrogen works in the body). This can cause blood estrogen levels to rise. Estrogen levels are higher in women who drink alcohol than in non-drinkers. These higher estrogen levels may in turn, increase the risk of breast cancer. Drinking alcohol raises the risk of some cancers. Drinking any kind of alcohol can contribute to cancers of the mouth and throat, larynx (voice box), esophagus, colon and rectum, liver, and breast (in women). The less alcohol you drink, the lower the risk of cancer.